Featured

Yegna tube #Ethiopia: New innovation which aims to reduce tiredness of drivers announced.

Loading...

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

You disliked this video. Thanks for the feedback!

A test for fatigue is being flagged as a future asset, and could be added to the alcohol breath-test and saliva drug swab bunch.

Often the forgotten killer, fatigue is estimated to be a factor in up to a third of serious traffic accidents in Victoria, killing around 50 people and injuring a further 300 every year.

New technology is being designed, and by tracking eye movements, including the durations of blinks and how eyes scan the road, driver fatigue levels can be measured.

A camera-based device may soon be made available in police vans, giving police the power to ask drivers to step into the van, and take a fatigue test.

Trials of the fatigue testing technology 

The Transport Accident Commission and Victorian Police have both thrown their support behind the idea, watching the development with a keen eye.

Austin Health Associate Professor Mark Howard is a sleep specialist leading this project, and said the common problem is that we fail to recognise the dangers associated with fatigue driving.

“People are aware of being fatigued, but they are poor at realising its high risk in terms of translating to accidents.

“By the time you are having an episode where you suddenly drop your head down, which many people experience, you’ve actually had a micro-sleep, and that puts you at real risk of having a crash,” he said.

A study released last week by the Sleep Health Foundation found that 20 percent of drivers had episodes of falling asleep, and about 5 percent of those had crashes in the past year.

By measuring speed and duration of eye/eye-lid movements, the technology will be able to accurately measure levels of drowsiness and fatigue by reaction times.

“Our goal is to refine that (the testing technology) over the next 12 months to 2-year period. We’re working with authorities at the same time to try and make sure the tools we develop are acceptable to them for usage for roadside testing,” Prof Howard said.

“The goal of this is to change people’s behaviour,” he said.

There are two main groups of people who find themselves at risk commonly: shift workers and mums.

Shift workers often get poor and inconsistent sleep, driving at night time…  while mothers are up for their children at night and in the morning, always on call. 

 

" />
Loading...
Added by admin
0 Views

 

A test for fatigue is being flagged as a future asset, and could be added to the alcohol breath-test and saliva drug swab bunch.

Often the forgotten killer, fatigue is estimated to be a factor in up to a third of serious traffic accidents in Victoria, killing around 50 people and injuring a further 300 every year.

New technology is being designed, and by tracking eye movements, including the durations of blinks and how eyes scan the road, driver fatigue levels can be measured.

A camera-based device may soon be made available in police vans, giving police the power to ask drivers to step into the van, and take a fatigue test.

Trials of the fatigue testing technology 

The Transport Accident Commission and Victorian Police have both thrown their support behind the idea, watching the development with a keen eye.

Austin Health Associate Professor Mark Howard is a sleep specialist leading this project, and said the common problem is that we fail to recognise the dangers associated with fatigue driving.

“People are aware of being fatigued, but they are poor at realising its high risk in terms of translating to accidents.

“By the time you are having an episode where you suddenly drop your head down, which many people experience, you’ve actually had a micro-sleep, and that puts you at real risk of having a crash,” he said.

A study released last week by the Sleep Health Foundation found that 20 percent of drivers had episodes of falling asleep, and about 5 percent of those had crashes in the past year.

By measuring speed and duration of eye/eye-lid movements, the technology will be able to accurately measure levels of drowsiness and fatigue by reaction times.

“Our goal is to refine that (the testing technology) over the next 12 months to 2-year period. We’re working with authorities at the same time to try and make sure the tools we develop are acceptable to them for usage for roadside testing,” Prof Howard said.

“The goal of this is to change people’s behaviour,” he said.

There are two main groups of people who find themselves at risk commonly: shift workers and mums.

Shift workers often get poor and inconsistent sleep, driving at night time…  while mothers are up for their children at night and in the morning, always on call. 

 

Category
Misc

Post your comment